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n Ms. Cheng’s IB Chinese class recently, we discussed the tendency of Taiwanese people to jump on whatever bandwagon seems popular at the moment..

This happened with the yellow duck, Krispy Kreme, and now it’s happening with the Cross-Strait Service Trade Agreement (CSSTA). Only this time, the crowd’s ignorant actions are immediately affecting the stock market and Taiwan’s international reputation. Without having proper knowledge of CSSTA, some students just jumped on the bandwagon out of boredom.

If this is truly a democratic system as their spray painted banners claim, the protesting students should feel more than free to voice their opinions without getting tipsy in the Legislative Yuan. Professors at NTU and NTNU even offered students the choice of checking in on Facebook at the Legislative Yuan as a substitution for class attendance, promoting students to join the protest.

What does this say about students sincerely interested in their education?

In an orderly society, criminals suffer consequences. Vandalism of a national historical monument is a crime. Therefore, the students are criminals, and should suffer consequences.

We cannot expect an already incompetent government to fight violence with reason, especially when both sides lack reason. Most of us are not knowledgeable enough to have informed opinions for or against the CSSTA; we do not know enough about economics or of politics to draw conclusions about the future of our beloved country.

However, any educated person should know that it is highly improbable for China to absorb Taiwan. Just because China wants to get Taiwan back, doesn’t mean it can.

And just because these students are filled with young blood, doesn’t mean they have the “freedom” to vandalize such a valuable historical monument; the Legislative Yuan is a place where many important decisions were made for our country’s welfare  and prosperity.

The student’s occupation of the Legislative Yuan and the government’s inability to control the situation the past week have been truly shameful.  Let our generation be defined not by our youth and craze, but by our intelligence.

 

Madeline H. is a senior at Taipei American School. This piece does not reflect the opinions of Taipei American School’s faculty or student body, or Blue & Gold. 

Please feel free to give your view of the protests by adding a comment below. If you would like to submit your own opinion in the form of an article, please email blueandgold@tas.tw