Speak about Anything: Abigail C. (‘22) takes part in MUN Impact Global Summit 2.0

%5BPHOTO+COURTESY+OF+ABIGAIL+C.+%28%2722%29%5D%0A

[PHOTO COURTESY OF ABIGAIL C. (’22)]

Amanda D. ('21)

From Oct. 23-25, Model United Nations Impact (MUN Impact) hosted the annual Global Summit 2.0, where student Abigail C. (‘22) hosted an hour-long workshop through Zoom called Global Youth & Generation Z: A Universal Initiative for Our Future. 

Every year, Taipei American School students have the opportunity to take part in this summit, either to introduce their clubs in relation to MUN, or discussing a part of their own life that they can tie into one of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. Abigail chose Goal 4: Quality Education, where she connected this theme with her own organization at school, called Global Youth. 

According to the description she wrote of her event on the MUN Impact website, Abigail’s main goals were to “help the international community recognize the power that youth hold for change in our rapidly moving world…[and] to be aware of youth’s antipathy and the lack of inspiration and growth due to our utilitarianism and neglective educative systems (especially traditional Asian curriculums), and methods to approach the situation.”

Abigail had to write, plan, and practice a speech on the topic with help from MUN directors and teachers from school. During and after the presentation, she also had to actively engage in a question and answer section that viewers could contribute to. The idea for this presentation stemmed from a longtime interest in youth education that began at the beginning of her sophomore year. 

“The most interesting thing is truly how huge the numbers are when you think about kids around the world that do not necessarily have education, or have these privileges that a lot of us do,” Abigail said. “And I think that was one of the reasons that kept pushing me to research and do more for this topic than I would have.”

In addition to learning more about youth education , the entire experience gave Abigail the ability to acquire skills that she otherwise would not have had the opportunity to explore in a classroom. 

“When you’re giving an hour long presentation, you really have to understand your material inside and out. And you also have to be prepared to answer questions like on the spot…It’s just a very practical life skill that you learn.” she said. 

Although the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic has inhibited many opportunities that are available this year, MUN Impact is an activity that is still open despite these difficulties. Over eight thousand students from 140 countries participated in this year’s event. 

“I think the important part right now is we’re hoping that students will use this time while they’re on island to consider what are the local actions they can take for Sustainable Development Goals and then be able to share that with others in the future,” said Upper School MUN Director Ms. Darby Sinclair. 

What is perhaps most significant about MUN Impact is its widespread accessibility to all students, regardless of their prior knowledge in MUN. With just a bit of dedication, time, and passion, you can engage in an exchange of ideas from around the world.  

“If you have an interest, you should definitely go for it. Because it really does help you develop and explore more of your own ideas for whatever topic you’re trying to do,” Abigail said. “You learn about practical life skills,, and you get to meet a lot of good people. It goes beyond just school, but into communities and on a global scale as well.”